Eclipse To Occur This Afternoon

Monday, August 21, 2017
by Reid Seals




A solar eclipse will occur this afternoon around 2:30 PM in East Tennessee. Greene County is celebrating in multiple ways.

The Andrew Johnson National Historic Site will have an eclipse viewing in their parking lot from 2:00 PM to 2:30 PM.

There will be an Eclipse Party today at Hardin Park. Free pizza and drinks are from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM. A telescope with a filter will be on site for viewing the eclipse, as well as amateur astronomers.

The United Way of Greene County will officially begin its 2017 campaign with an eclipse viewing party today at 2:00 PM in front of Pioneer Field on the Tusculum College campus, and will be held jointly with the Tusculum Office of Student Affairs. Snacks and solar-proof glasses will be provided for the event.

There is a Joint Hike with the Old Timers Club to view the total eclipse of the sun. The viewpoint will be at the Ross Mountain Dove Field, about 7 miles north of Walhalla, South Carolina. This drive is about 150 miles one way. Bring a picnic lunch, water and solar viewing glasses. Meet at the Asheville Highway Hardees at 7:00 AM. For more information, call 639-8567.

The Roby Fitzgerald Adult Center will make eclipse viewers today at 9:00 AM in the Green room. They will have an eclipse viewing at 12:30 PM at the front entrance.

Schools have special hours today due to the eclipse.

Greene County Schools will dismiss at 11:30 AM today due to safety concerns regarding the eclipse. All ESP programs will be dismissed at 11:30 AM as well. All after school activities (sports, clubs, etc.) will be postponed until 5:00 PM. Central Office will remain open on a regular schedule.

Greeneville City Schools school day will be extended by 30 minutes due to the solar eclipse. The peak of the eclipse will occur around 2:30 PM, when school is normally dismissing. Glasses will be available for students to view the eclipse.

All Walters State Community College campuses will close at 12:30 PM today. The decision to close during the solar eclipse was based on the safety of students and staff.

Matt Hinkin of the East Tennessee Weather Network gave a rundown of the eclipse:

Click for audio


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